Simple and Healthy Matcha Green Tea Latte

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A few weeks ago on the “Today Show,” they did a segment on matcha green tea. That sparked my interest enough that I went to Starbucks to purchase a cold green tea latte. It was sweet and delicious and it reminded me of one of my favorite ice creams, green tea. So when I got home, I did some research on the internet and then proceeded to my local Teavana store. After getting over the sticker shock of the price of the matcha, I purchased the larger tin of tea, the bamboo whisk and the frother.

After reading more articles and recipes and viewing YouTube videos, I came up with the recipe that suited my needs. As far as sweetening the matcha tea, tea aficionados recommend rock sugar, because it doesn’t affect the flavor. They are also picky about using filtered water and filtered water for the ice! Well, I hope you enjoy my recipe and don’t be afraid to tweak it to your tastes!

Facts about Matcha Green Tea

  • Matcha is powdered green tea leaves, grown and prepared in a different method from traditional green tea.
  • It is contains more nutrients than steeped green tea. Matcha is rich in the antioxidants, polyphenols, which are connected to protection against cancer and heart disease, better blood sugar regulation, anti-aging and reducing blood pressure. Since matcha contains the entire ground tea leaf, it can contain over 100 times the powerful antioxidant EGCG provided from regular brewed green tea.
  • Lead contamination is a concern, even with organic tea. 90% of the lead is contained in the leaf, so a cup of matcha may have 30 times more lead than a regular cup of tea. According to Mercola.com, “no measurable amounts in Teavana brand, which get its tea leaves from Japan.” ConsumerLab.com recommends drinking no more than one cup per day and not serving it to children.
  • High quality matcha is expensive. Teavana Matcha, which is organic and from Japan, is $44.95 for 80 grams. One teaspoon is 3.5 grams, which comes to 22 servings per can. It is definitely cheaper than buying your lattes at Starbucks!
  • Matcha has more caffeine than steeped tea, up to 3 times as much. To give you a comparison a “Short” cup of coffee at Starbucks is 180 mg. of caffeine, while one teaspoon of Teavana Matcha is 41+ mg.
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Kitchen tools and ingredients necessary to make the matcha green tea latte: frother, rock sugar, matcha, teaspoon and bamboo whisk. Not pictured: milk and ice.

Bamboo whisk

The beautiful and delicate design of the bamboo whisk.

Ingredients:

  • 1 teaspoon matcha green tea powder (organic, ceremonial grade from Japan)
  • 4 teaspoons filtered water (very hot, but not boiling)
  • 3 teaspoon rock sugar simple syrup (see recipe below)
  • 1 cup organic nonfat milk (or milk of your choice, like almond)
  • 1 cup ice made from filtered water

Directions:

  1. Sift green tea powder into a small bowl. Add hot water and whisk together using a bamboo whisk.
  2. Add simple syrup.
  3. In a glass pint measuring cup, frothe the milk.
  4. In a tall glass, add ice, matcha and most of the milk, stir well. Then top with remaining milk, which should be mostly foam. Sift a little matcha on top and serve immediately.

German Rock Sugar Simple Syrup: 

  • ¼ cup rock sugar
  • ¼ cup hot filtered water

Using a microwave safe dish, heat water until just boiling. Add the rock sugar and stir. Stir occasionally, until sugar has completely dissolved. Can be stored in the refrigerator up to one week, according to Teavana. (Their recipe called for larger quantities, but I chose to use smaller amounts). I was able to get 17 teaspoons of simple syrup with my recipe.

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Blogger’s Note: Information for this blog came from the following sources:

http://time.com/3766975/matcha-green-tea/

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2013/07/03/green-tea-benefits.aspx

http://www.teavana.com/the-teas/green-teas/p/matcha-japanese-green-tea

http://www.starbucks.com/menu/drinks/tea/green-tea-latte#size=

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